Our ‘Hero’ Sue

A year ago Sue Baker could not have run two kilometres, much less a half marathon.

Sue, a one-day-a-week jogger and Sunday soccer player, was looking for a new challenge when she joined a running group which included a marathon runner.
The next thing she knew she and five members of the group – Shannon Meredith, Kim Hood, Nerida Miller, BJ Ammon and Luke Formica – were in training for The Sydney Morning Herald Half Marathon, a grueling 21.1 kilometre race around Pyrmont , the city and Botanic gardens which she finished in 2 hours, 21 minutes.

To prepare, she trained five days a week with two break days. One of her training runs was along Wheatley Road, Engadine, which locals know to be one long heartbreak hill.

”My first 10km run I thought I would die,” she said. ”In hindsight, Wheatley Road was a good place to train as it was not unlike the course through Sydney.
”Initially training for the half marathon was just a challenge, but then I thought ‘if I’m doing this I might as well help support a worthy cause”.

”Through my work with Professor Marissa Lassere* at St George Hospital I was aware of the St George and Sutherland Medical Research Foundation and I knew how passionate they are about what they do. I’m proud to say we raised $2600 for the Foundation.”
”I feel quite good about myself, being able to achieve that goal. My only concern now is not to lose that fitness. It’s scary how quickly you can lose it.”

Sue’s next run is the 11km Sutherland to Surf on July 19, followed by the Brighton Beachside Dash (a Foundation event) and perhaps the Blackmore’s half marathon at the end of October.

*Sue is working toward her masters degree in philosophy and public health and one of her projects is the Patient-held Health File (PHF) project, which has been going for four years and involves 390 patients and more than 100 GPs/Specialists . It involves giving patients over the age of 60 with chronic disease their health records to carry, either on a USB or small notebook, which are updated by their doctors at each visit, an important aspect of communication and continuity of care especially in our aging population.